Taking Great Photos

I have been playing with my new camera, trying out different techniques and combinations, I bought these buttons for the button bouquet I was making for my daughter’s wedding and I bought this pretty little cup at the local tablet top sale. It was taken in my only ‘darkroom’ space – my bathroom which has no natural light. I used simple table top lamps for illumination and played with the direction of the light to see the different effects. 
I think there are some people who are naturally gifted at staging – they can make the simplest object look stunning! Just look at this collection here, taken from a French sewing book. The whole thing seems to have a restful harmony.   
             
The problem is that I am in the middle of a project and don’t want to stop and ‘stage’ what I am doing! Sometimes I have ideas of what I would like to do and take lots of pictures only to forget to upload them! 
It is my intention to develop this skill so that I will be able to see how my photography has developed over time, which is the great thing about a blog. While I might look back and cringe at some of the photography – or even the projects (gasp!) it is a great way to see how my skills have improved (well hopefully!) 
I bought this book on line – sometimes I regret it, there is nothing nicer than browsing in a bookstore with a nice latte beside me, but this book has lived up to its title. Taking great photos talks a language that I can understand, the photography examples are beautiful and inspirational – and she pretty much covers all my needs without bamboozling me with technicalities (ok by that I mean numbers!) I hope it will up my game! but let me not be the judge of that! I would recommend it – in this new cyber world where online selling has become a normal part of our lives, it is definitely worth a read. 
A friend of mine is a great photographer; he taught me a lot about how to see – most importantly we never left home without a camera! I think it helps you to sit back from the ‘busyness’ of life, and become an observer. It is surprising just how much you notice. It can make something as beautiful and transitory – like a flower – have its beauty set forever. 

Southsea gardens Spring 2011